Religious Studies

The aim of the Religious Studies department is to enable students to have a clear understanding of the key beliefs held by a range of people in society and equip them with the ability to explore those beliefs and their application to their own lives. It aims to promote the spiritual and moral growth of pupils through discussion and debate and by developing their own awareness of themselves and those around them.

The topics covered are a key part of the Kent Agreed Syllabus for Religious Studies, and we have selected those areas that seem to relate most closely to the students and their interests. Religious Studies demands a high level of response from the students in that, whilst it explores the key concepts within World Faiths, it also looks at the impact this has on society and how they feel about the beliefs they are exploring.

Lower School Curriculum

Year 7

The Island.

  • This is a story that is told over the term. It is about a group of people who set sail on a luxury cruise from Dover to New York. On the last night of the cruise, the ship runs aground on an island, an Island that did not exist in the world they knew. Gradually the community realise that they are going to be there forever, and will not be rescued. As the class respond to the situations that arise in their new life, they begin to devise rites of passage, laws, festivals, holy books, special places and pilgrimage – without realising that they are.

What was so radical about Jesus?

  • This investigation enables pupils to learn in depth from different Christians about their view of Jesus, and how people within a religion or world view understand and live out the teachings of Jesus in the world around them.

What is good/challenging about being a teenage Muslim/Sikh/Buddhist in Britain today?

  • This investigation enables pupils to learn in depth from Buddhists, Muslims and / or Sikhs and their ways of living, beliefs and communities, providing opportunities to consider challenging questions about the place of religion in Britain today and in pupils’ own thinking.

 

Year 8

Does religion help people to be good?

  • This investigation enables pupils to learn in depth from different religious and spiritual ways of life about being good and living well in society.

Should happiness be the purpose of life?

  • This investigation enables pupils to learn in depth from Christianity, Buddhism and non-religious worldviews about the significance of happiness. Through a study of the idea of happiness in the bible, the concept of dukkha and comparing the religious idea of ‘the good life’ to a non-religious view of ‘the good life’. Is it morally acceptable to pursue attaining happiness?

Is death the end?

  • This investigation enables pupils to learn in depth from different religious and spiritual ways of life about their view of suffering, and how people within a religion or world view understand and live with suffering in the world around them.

How can people express the spiritual through Music and Art?

  • This investigation enables students to learn in depth from different religious and spiritual ways of life about the concepts of worship, meditation and celebration, considering a diverse range of views about questions of expression and meaning in relation to spirituality and faith.

 

Year 9

Do we need to prove God’s existence?

  • This investigation enables pupils to learn in depth from different religions and worldviews about the place of belief, exploring why Buddhists are relatively unconcerned about the idea of God, why this is a vital matter for Christians, and why atheists reject the idea of God. The concept of proof is examined alongside related ideas about evidence, belief, perspective and interpretation.

Why is there suffering?

  • This investigation enables pupils to learn in depth from different religious and spiritual ways of life about their view of suffering, and how people within a religion or world view understand and live with suffering in the world around them.

Is religion a power for peace or a cause of conflict in the world?

  • This investigation enables pupils to learn in depth from different religious examples of engagement with conflict and peace, exploring the issues. It provides opportunities for ‘dangerous conversation. Pupils will develop argumentative skills using different dimensions of the topic.

 

GCSE Curriculum

Exam Board: Edexcel B

All students study the GCSE full course in RS.  They study two modules over two years of the Edexcel Religious Studies B Beliefs in Action GCSE.  Each unit is worth 50 per cent of the total GCSE marks.

Area of Study 1: Religion and Ethics through Christianity

Area of Study 2: Religion, Peace and Conflict through Islam

 

Year 10

  • Islam: Muslim Beliefs
  • Islam: Living the Muslim Life
  • Christianity: Christian Beliefs
  • Christianity: Marriage and the family
  • Islam: Crime and Punishment

Year 11

  • Christianity: Living the Christian Life
  • Christianity: Matters of life and death
  • Islam: Peace and Conflict

To view A-Level course content, please click here.

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